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Last evening while I was admiring the pink sunset…..

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….E was admiring the rising of the moon.  She called to me to come and see it as it was so large and orange.  I joined her at her bedroom window and we watched it slowly slide up the sky behind the trees.  I went into my room hoping to see it more clearly from there and saw below me on the drive, the hare again!  Typically, I had the wrong camera with me, it was too dark and the hare wouldn’t stay and be photographed.

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This is the only photo I managed to get.

I went outside into the twilight with little bats flying about the garden and crossed the road and looked at the moon through the hedge.  It wasn’t orange any more but it was still beautiful.

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The visit from the hare and the rising moon reminded me that hares are supposed to be magical and people today still take care not to hurt a hare.  One of Mum’s neighbours was new to the area a few years ago and asked another neighbour how he could get rid of the rabbits and hares which were damaging the trees and plants in his garden.  He was told that the rabbits could be shot but ‘we don’t shoot hares in Suffolk’.  In Anglo Saxon mythology, Ostara the goddess of the moon, fertility and Spring was often depicted with hare’s ears or a hare’s head.  Eostre (where we get the word Easter from) was the Celtic version of Ostara and was the goddess associated with the moon, death, redemption and resurrection during the turning of Winter into Spring.  Eostre was a shape-shifter too and took the shape of a hare at each full moon.  Well, well, well!  (I looked all that up using Google!).

Yesterday was a busy one with my usual shopping with Mum and then going to Halesworth to hand in my prescription at the surgery and post a couple of letters.  I got home just after 2.00pm and had some lunch.  The afternoon was spent dusting, vacuuming and doing more mending.  R got home just as I was finishing.  He had had a fraught day at work so after we had had our cup of tea he went into the garden and planted out his peas and beans.  A soothing task which took him over an hour and was all done except the watering-in by the time I had cooked the evening meal.

This morning I went out to admire his handiwork.

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Putting the anti-rabbit/deer/hare/pigeon etc barriers up had taken most of the time yesterday.  We hope they work!  You can see the potatoes coming up in the bed behind the peas and beans.  While I was down at the vegetable patch I had a look at the pond and saw a strange looking duck.  I tried taking its photo with my small camera but wasn’t able to get a clear picture.  I fetched our newer, better camera and tried again.

 

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I think this is a female tufted duck who visited to sample the fish in our pond.  I had to crop the photos as I still couldn’t get near enough to the duck.  The pond, as you see, is covered in the fluffy seeds of Goat Willow.  The seeds aren’t only on the pond but are everywhere, floating in the air, covering the grass, coming into the house.

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This is a spider’s web I noticed yesterday on the outside of one of our windows.  It is covered with fluffy willow seeds.  Despite my brushing the web away very often the spider insists on making its web just there all the time.

The rest of this post will be a strange selection of photos that I took today and some others that I haven’t been able to put in any of my recent posts.

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This is a late entry in the apple blossom awards.  We thought the Bramley Apple wasn’t going to flower this year, but we were wrong!

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The Cedar of Lebanon has new leaves growing that look like old-fashioned shaving brushes.

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All the hollies have new leaves too.

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The Japanese Maple has the most beautiful cherry-red seeds.

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It has beautiful leaves too that glow in the sunshine.

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I got home yesterday and saw a Jay in the garden.  I had great difficulty taking these photos from inside the car.

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This is one of my Christmas Cacti and it is flowering again for the third time in six months.  It first flowered in November, then in February and now in May.  I think it is very confused!

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R’s cacti are all coming in to flower too.

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Mammalaria

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Mammalaria flower

 

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Peanut cactus flower.

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I don’t know what this one is called.

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The little white Alliums in the garden are very popular with the bees.  They are under the laburnum trees which are also full of bees and the noise they make is astounding.  I think they sound like cars in a grand prix race – the pitch is almost exactly the same – it’s like listening to a race about a mile away.

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The new shoots on the Viburnum Bodnantense are crimson.

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Tiny damsons.

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Willow seeds.

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Bee on the cotoneaster horizontalis.

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Geranium Phaeum in R’s flowerbed.

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Flowers on the Spindle tree.

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The Hawthorn hedge at the bottom of the garden near the old summerhouse.

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A White-shouldered House Moth

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R took these photos of a muntjac deer.

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A chaffinch

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One of my herbs – cedronella canariensis (Balm of Gilead).

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Alpine Pasque Flower

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A Great Tit

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A Stock Dove.

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A female Pheasant.

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A Zebra Spider.  These spiders are only about 4mm long.  They are jumping spiders and can leap a distance of about 4cm.

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A baby House Spider.

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The tiny flowers of Thyme-Leaved Speedwell.

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Aquilegia flower

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Thrift flower

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The wonderfully scented Clematis Montana ‘Rubens’

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Shrub rose ‘Canary Bird’

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Blackberry flowers

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Knautica Macedonica

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Aquilegia flower

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Reflections in the pond

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Common sedge

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Common Vetch

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An ant hill

 

 

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Male Holly flower buds.  We don’t have any female holly bushes so no berries!

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Heart-shaped berries of the Winter-flowering Honeysuckle

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These lovely berries don’t last long as the blackbirds find them irresistible.